L’Escargot Fantaisie

IMG_6759The text below this jolly Martlets snail outside the Jubilee Libaray reads: “This Snail is a riotous display of colour and portrays the renowned (and feared) chef Jacques le Méchant.  The cunning cook has devised a way to infliltrate snail kingdom in search of the tasties snails for his famous restaurant L’Escargot Fantaisie!” 

This is probably an impenetrable in-joke … but as long as the Martlets Hospice makes lots of dosh from it, who cares? fin symbol

La Boxe

 

Carpentier manager 1921

Source gallica.bnf.fr / BnF

TO MEET AT EXHIBITION BOUT
AT BRIGHTON

Georges Carpentier and his manager, François Dechamps, are coming to England to take part in the annual boxing programme promoted by Brighton’s most popular townsman, Mr Harry Preston.

On this occasion Deschamps will don the gloves with the genial Harry, who, in his prime was a great boxer.  Georges will be in his manager’s corner, while another world-famous fighter will second Mr. Preston. PALL MALL GAZETTE 14 Oct 1921

The star attraction was, of course, Georges Charpentier, middleweight champion of the world from 1920 to 1922, so here he is, in Brighton, in October 1921 with (according to the Gallica caption): 

De droite à gauche MM.] V. [Victor] Beyer, [Harry] Preston, [Georges] Carpentier, [François] Descamps [venus pour un tournoi de boxe à Brigthon : photographie de presse / Agence Rol

[From right to left Beyer, Preston, Charpentier, Descamps in Brigthon for a boxing match] 

Ah, that mythical city, Brigthon !

carpentier, preston and Deschamps 1921

Source gallica.bnf.fr / BnF

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Joseph Marie Quero

During her research for the Fabrica Gallery on ‘The Boys on the Plaque’, Lyn Turpin found a rather curious name: Quero.  Lyn’s research shows that, following death of both his parents, at the age of 12 Joseph Marie (or William) Query became an apprentice hairdresser in a prestigious Parisian salon.  Ten years later he set off for England, married Brighton girl, Bessie, and set up his hairdressing business at 32 Ship Street.  Joseph Marie was not just a run-of-the-mill hairdresser.  He was a coiffeur pour dames and a perruquier [wig-make].  Joseph did not retire from the Ship Street salon until 1950.

As the family grew, the Queros moved their home to 66 Hallyburton Road in Hove.  Nostalgia must have kicked in as Brittany-born Joseph give his house a Breton name Ker Armor [villa near the sea].

For a  more detailed account of Joseph’s life and some terrific photos, go to Lyn’s article.

Much more information is available from ‘The Boys of the Plaque” WW1 project.

3 May 1968 – Hove

media_file_2603At the beginning of the first week of May 1968, French universities closed their admin. departments.  On 3 May, the students made their objections very clear.  By the end of the week, 20 000 of them were rioting in central Paris.  A few days later, the barricades were up.  By the end of the following week, 2 million workers were on strike.  France was paralysed and stayed so until the beginning of June.  What were Brighton and Hove doing at the time?
Continue reading

Brighton and Hove French Circle: Update

The Brighton and Hove French Circle prides itself on being one of oldest French Circles in the country.  But was it really founded in 1915 as we have always claimed?  Well, yes,

This little snippet seems to show that Antoine Désiré Joye, teacher of French and Pasteur of the French Protestant Church in Queensbury Mews (see blog of December 2016) was at the fountainhead of the Cercle Français.  For 10/6d you could attend a course of 30 lectures on literature given by the man himself.

Source: The British Newspaper Archive

The French Circle still continues the tradition of providing a series of subscription lectures and talks throughout the winter months. Continue reading

Miss Arabella and Mlle Rosette by the sea

Source gallica.bnf.fr / BnF

When a certain B.L. arrived in Brighton in 1866, he took a rather harsh look at the inhabitants of the town.  His article was published in the weekly magazine “La Vie Parisienne”.  B.L. starts his piece by satirising the drivers of the fly carriages before pillorying the street sellers, the urchins and finally the beggars in the street.  But the main barb of his article is reserved for the bourgeoisie. Continue reading

Petit Pois

Tucked away just off the seafront, you will find Petit Pois, a French restaurant run by David and his wife, Ivana.  This is David’s story.

“I trained as a chef in France, mostly Michelin-starred restaurants: L’auberge de l’Eridan (Annecy 3*); le Domaine de Bournissac (Provence 1*) and Le Pastel (Toulouse 1*)  After travelling in several countries, I decided to give it a go in England to discover a new lifestyle.  And to improve my English. Continue reading