Caen Stone: Part One – Mediaeval

You have taken off in a small private plane from Brighton City Airport at Shoreham-by-Sea.  The plane heads directly due south.  About 40 minutes and 177 km later you pass over the coast of France at Ouistreham.  Your pilot follows the course of the river Orne.  Below you, you spot a white gash amid the pattern of green fields. 

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The port of Ouistreham, the Orne river and its canal. In the bottom left-hand corner, the modern outskirts of Caen. (c) Google

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Vive France

Vive France 5 sized

Photo: S. Hinton 29 November 2021 Photo taken on the walkway above the Madeira Arches.

Don’t graffiti.

Don’t graffiti if your French grammar not accurate.

Don’t graffiti even if your sentiments would be approved by many people.

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Dansez français

Jan Mulreany shares her passion.

You might not think you would ever encounter a full set of cornemuses Auvergnates or cabrettes [bagpipes from the Auvergne region] in a Sussex pub, nor hear the wail of a French hurdy-gurdy as you come round the corner in Shoreham, but for the last thirty years someone has been doing this in Brighton, and dancing to it too.

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Dansez Français demonstrate their skills at the Centenary celebrations of the Brighton and Hove French Circle. Her Majesty the Queen gazes benevolently at the Breton flag. The Hove Club, 2015. Image: Suzanne Hinton.

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Jacques-Joseph Tissot in Brighton

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                                                James Tissot “Too Early” (1873) Source unknown

After being wounded in the Franco Prussian-war, and having briefly supported the Paris Commune in 1871, Jacques-Joseph Tissot made his way to London.  There he settled from some 11 years. He found immediate success.  The public and most critics admired the “delicacy of tone” in his pictures of “pretty English girls”. Continue reading

Les Ateliers de Brighton

Atelier Feb 2020

Originally tucked away in Providence Place, but now chased out by re-development in London Road, this tiny shop has spread its wings and flown down to 165 Kings Road Arches.  It now goes under the name of Tutton and Young’s Atelier by the seaside.  Still a great choice for buying exquisite small works of art or booking into a course on embroidery, jewellery, drawing, painting and many more.

Atelier beside the seaside

Next stop should be perhaps one of the several Atelier de vin in Brighton.  The one below is at Seven Dials.

L'Atelier du Vin 7 Dials Sept 2021

If romance should blossom in L’Atelier du Vin, and wedding bells might be going to ring, the Atelier Gold Brighton is the place to go.  Stunning wedding gowns and a warm welcome from the couturière, Roxy, are waiting at 80B St James’s Street. 

However, before putting on the wonderful gown, the bride or the groom should be coiffed at Atelier 66 Hair Avenue at a discrete, unphotographed address in Dyke Road.  There she or he can benefit from a French blayage [hair colouring] or many other L’Oréal treatments.  The client can watch an introductory video – Le hair show – part of which, La masterclass, is essential viewing.

Not an atelier, but brilliantly named – Hair du Jour is run by French cousins, Stéphane Rault from Paris and Johan Barbaçon from Brittany, at 63 London Road.  Another gem of Anglo-French fusion.

Hair du jour 2 june 2020

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The French Honorary Consul (2) 1821 and 2021

Early in 2021 Frederic Laloux was appointed French Honorary Consul for Brighton and Newhaven.  M. Laloux is the most recent incumbent of an official post reaching back to at least 1821. This post is unpaid, apart from expenses.  It occasionally carries the title Vice-Consul as the local consuls (there are about 30 across the UK) report to the Consul Général in London.

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Brighton as the first Honorary French Consul would have known it in the 1820s. Image (c) Regency Society / Society of Brighton Print Collectors

 

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